Image Image Image Image Image
Scroll to Top

To Top

01

Sep
2014

In Branding
Design
Typography

Lotuff Leather Has Typographic Logo That Politely Says “Premium”

On 01, Sep 2014 | | In Branding, Design, Typography |

From the designer:

Lotuff Leather creates fine quality, handcrafted leather bags by combining inherent functionality with classic beauty. We partnered with Lotuff to re-brand their design—the project includes, brand identity, stationery system, print collateral, product packaging, and an e-commerce website. We designed a logo that would be as timeless as their bags and created a branding system that validates the sense of luxury and quality found in each Lotuff product. The color palette is defined by a warm black with undertones of brown, tan, and an aubergine accent color. The print materials were letterpressed on premium, uncoated, off-white paper. The website is built on a customized e-commerce platform. Check out the Lotuff Leather website we designed here.

“We approached Bluerock Design with the project of giving our e-commerce site a design refresh that could translate seamlessly to our other forms of collateral, from stationary to packaging. We were on a quest for an overarching look that, despite the inherent contradiction, was both classic and modern. Ben and Lainey delivered clean, beautiful results that continue to strike just the right chord. They were open to our input and incorporated tweaks and suggestions whenever necessary. Their belief in our brand was apparent, and it showed through in their genuine desire to make something timeless.”
–Lotuff Leather

Learn more about the designer at bluerockdesignco.com.

lotuff leather packaging design 001 lotuff leather packaging design 002 lotuff leather packaging design 005 lotuff leather packaging design 006 lotuff leather packaging design 003 lotuff leather packaging design 007 lotuff leather packaging design 004 lotuff leather packaging design 008

Modern Stationery Design with a Classic Edge – Seed House

On 30, Aug 2014 | | In Branding, Design, Identity, Typography |

Stitch Design Co. is a design firm with a strong sense of spacing and type. We especially like their stationery design. First and foremost they brand and communicate. Their work on Seed House shows off their design aesthetic. Seed House is a print shop that would rather do work right and by hand. They’re lucky to have such a strong brand, thanks in large part to Stitch Design Co.

Check out more of their work at stitchdesignco.com.

seed house branding stationery 0011 seed house branding stationery 0021 seed house branding stationery 0031 seed house branding stationery 0041 seed house branding stationery 0051 seed house branding stationery 0061

29

Aug
2014

In Branding
Packaging

Why Packaging Design Matters to High End Brands – Minori Sake

On 29, Aug 2014 | | In Branding, Packaging |

This packaging design incorporates multiple, complementary materials and a bold color scheme. It was produced by Michael Nguyen, a Communication Design student at RMIT University. A second year project to package a product into a high-end target audience. The brand identity developed is called ‘Minori’ meaning harvest in Japanese. The cloudy sake references rice growers of the Niigata region.

You can find Michael @ www.michaelnguyendesign.com.

minori sake packaging 0011minori sake packaging 002 minori sake packaging 003 minori sake packaging 005minori sake packaging 0041

28

Aug
2014

In Branding
Typography

Luthia – A Fresh Take on Branding Typography with Plenty of White Space

On 28, Aug 2014 | | In Branding, Typography |

Luthia is a Buenos Aires based firm. It sells handmade, detailed and artisanal backpacks and totes. Through a simple yet elegant design we tried to communicate the brand attributes of simplicity, happiness and quality. We achieved this through a minimal and tactile aesthetic; white & grey palette, porous & pure white paper and embossing. It is a minimalistic and aesthetically pleasing brand.

-Empatia

Empatia is a small firm and proud of it. They work with great brands and their designs are always minimal and focused on clean typography. Their process is well-defined – it’s spelled out on their beautiful website – and incorporates a healthy dose of listening and client objectives before ever getting to design. In other words, they focus on branding that gets results. Real ones.

luthia branding typography001 luthia branding typography002

The typographic branding conveys function and simple form that quickly communicates. Like a bag, it is the job of the brand to perform a definite purpose and then get out of the way. At the same time, it’s always with you keeping your valuables, so it had better look good.

luthia branding typography003 luthia branding typography004

The embossed detail on Luthia’s business cards adds a new dimension to the typography. The focus on white space and the removal of all non-essential information maintains the high functionality and elegance of the brand.

luthia branding typography005 luthia branding typography006 luthia branding typography007 luthia branding typography008

We especially love the tags that look more like well-designed decoration. When buying a fashion accessory we expect everything to be high fashion – including the packaging.

luthia branding typography009 luthia branding typography010 luthia branding typography011 luthia branding typography012 luthia branding typography013 luthia branding typography014 luthia branding typography015 luthia branding typography016 luthia branding typography017 luthia branding typography018 luthia branding typography019 luthia branding typography020 luthia branding typography021

The elegant script typography on the tags conveys almost a whispered message to the reader.

Check out more of Empatia’s work at www.helloempatia.com.

28

Aug
2014

In Packaging

How to Take Coffee Packaging Out of the Bag – Wishbone Brew

On 28, Aug 2014 | | In Packaging |

One of the key roles of Packaging is to ‘represent an experience’ in the decision making process – it can remind customers of the experience they had before (if they bought it before and liked it) or represent the experience that they are hoping to have (if they haven’t purchased it before). At that moment of truth when they are standing at the shelf or comparing product online, subconsciously they are deciding which will deliver the best experience.

-Joshua Vanderheide

Just read one of Joshua’s posts about packaging and you’re immediately struck by his dedication. His constant questioning leads to imagination and new ideas. The coffee packaging for Wishbone Brew is different. It combines an industrial look – how a motor oil can might have looked in the 50′s - with plenty of white space, warm colors, and a slightly unexpected product inside.

Serifs and Sans talked to Joshua about his work on the project.

AKA 070614x008

What was your inspiration for this particular design?

We challenged ourselves to re-think traditional coffee packaging. We love coffee, but see that most people use the same containers and vessels, we thought there was an opportunity to take a new, fresh approach with a handcrafted feel.

AKA 070614x018

What are three of the principles that guide your design choices?

Knowledge – researching the market, understanding the creative and competitive landscape to know how to best position a brand in the market. Simplicity – in a cluttered world, simple things stand out and gain attention using restrain vs. shouting at the consumer. Tactility – Holding and feeling something in your hands is where you can make true emotional connections with brands and packaging, it has to feel nice, not just look nice.

WB 062614x009

Who is the designer you look up to the most and why?

Steve Grasse (Art in the Age) – He has moved from designer to product maker, most known for designing and creating

Hendricks Gin – he has gone beyond the design to build a product using his design skill set and done very well.

Stranger and Stranger – For their attention to detail and execution and promotion of high quality packaging work.

WB 062614x004 600x407

What is the one tool you couldn’t live without?

The internet. It has allowed for us to quickly research the markets and broaden our perspective into visual trends and ideas from places outside our local markets.

Joshua Vanderheide and Jesse Bannister founded Also Known As in 2010 in Vancouver, Canada. Impressed with what you see? You should be. Check out more of their work at www.alsoknownas.ca.